Five Summer All-Stars

Plant these flowers for a garden that blooms during summer’s worst weather.

By Jeff Cox

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Moonbeam threaded coreopsis is perfect for the summer garden ‘Moonbeam’ Threaded Coreopsis
Coreopsis verticillata ‘Moonbeam’
USDA Plant Hardiness Zones: 3 to 9
Blooms: June to frost
Height x Width: 2 feet X 18 inches
Flower color: Pale yellow
Light requirements: Full sun to partial shade

The first thing you notice about this all-star is the beautiful, pale yellow color of its wide, daisylike flowers. The color looks good with just about any other color in the garden. The flowers are neat and tidy with dark, golden centers and are produced in upright, wiry-stemmed sprays that cover the tops of the foliage from late June all the way to the frost.

In addition to its galaxy of golden flowers, ‘Moonbeam’ has fine, ferny, threadlike foliage. Given all the large-leaved plants in the perennial garden, what a relief to have an all-star with foliage that can provide some contrast.

Don’t worry about the soil where you’re planting ’Moonbeam’ coreopsis. It can be average or poor, and as long as it’s well-drained, it can even be droughty. ‘Moonbeam’ will continue to bloom and look fine, so you don't have to worry about a lot of watering during the summer.

Although ‘Moonbeam’ prefers a sunny spot, it performs well in partial shade. Don’t worry about the effects of heat and humidity if you live in the South—this plant is native from Maryland to Florida and west to Alabama and Arkansas.

The pale yellow ‘Moonbeam’ flowers contrast beautifully with rich purples and blues, and is one of the few yellow shades that sets off pink hues to advantage. Create drifts of ‘Moonbeam’ to tie together stronger flower colors and bolder foliage textures in your perennial garden. ‘Moonbeam’ makes a great container plant, too, and is tough enough to fill a hanging basket in a sunny spot.

Photo: (cc) Tom Beck/Flickr

 
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