3 Easy Ways to Save Energy This Fall

Keep your house warm, snug, and energy-efficient all winter long.

By Emily Main

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Simple changes in your home could mean lower energy bills for you!With cold temperatures quickly approaching, Brew gave three tips for saving energy this fall:

1. Seal up your windows. "Any season of the year is a good season to seal up the house," says Brew. But you may notice leaky windows more in the fall or winter, particularly if drafts blowing in around the frame make you cold. In the past, our Nickel Pincher Jean Nick has suggested ways to turn leaky windows into powerful energy-saving windows by sealing cracks from the outside. Brew has an even easier way to cut down on leaks, and it'll only cost you a few dollars. The best part? You can do it all from the inside. First, take off the trim around your windows and floorboards on inside of the house walls. If you feel comfortable that you won't get electrocuted, take off your outlet covers and pull the outlet out of the wall, as well. Then, using a low-expanding foam sealant, start filling in any cracks or small holes you might see (if you don't see any, Brew suggests using a lit incense stick to detect air leaks). "This is the most effective thing people can do in houses that were built before 2000, which is about 85 percent of the homes out there," he says. While you're doing that, he adds, take out any insulation you see there and spray your low-expanding foam in its place. "Historically, people took bad insulation and just pounded it into place with a screwdriver or the end of a hammer," he says. In most cases, that bad insulation is pretty ineffective at keeping out drafts. "It's literally a weekend project," Brew says, "and you can easily see a 10 to 15 percent—or more—change in your energy bills."

2. Insulate your attic door. While any time of year is a good time to seal windows, fall is the perfect time to attend to your attic. "Why fall? It's a lot cooler up there!" Brew says. "Anytime after the third or fourth week of September, go to the attic and poke around, and look at the attic insulation." While heat loss is generally greater through windows and walls, it's much cheaper and easier to add insulation to your attic, and you'll still save money on your energy bill. An added benefit for people who live in far northern climates that get a lot of snow is that extra attic insulation helps prevent "ice dams," according to the University of Minnesota Extension Service. Ice dams are ridges of ice that form on a rooftop and prevent melting snow from draining; the melted snow then leaks into the home, where it causes serious water damage.

While you're adding insulation, check out your attic door itself. "Your attic door can be responsible for up to 15 percent of your home's heat loss," says Brew. "Many are just a panel of drywall that sits on a lip, and they're usually at the highest point of the house where all the heat and energy are trying to get out." You don't need to seal them permanently shut, he says. Just put some gasketing around them if your attic door is the type that gets pulled down from the ceiling, or add some weather-stripping around the door frame if it's the type that opens and shuts like an ordinary room door. For the latter, you can also make an easy DIY door snake to keep drafts to a minimum.

 

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